Dining and Restaurants / Eating / Food and Cooking

2011 FOOD TRENDS: Teaching butchery; Pickled hops shoots; ‘Peppier’ rejected; The anti-locavores; The art of opening an eatery

Nibbles is a compendium of food, dining and beverage information from the U.S. and the world edited by John Lehndorff

Reported at: http://eatocracy.cnn.com/2010/09/08/chefs-with-issues-a-plea-for-butchery-classes-in-school/

Frank Bonanno, owner/chef of Mizuna, Luca D’Italia, Osteria Marco and Bones in Denver, makes a plea for butchery:

I was invited to break down a fish on a local morning show last week. Why is a chef filleting snapper over a Sterno flame in a brightly lit news room at eight in the morning? Because cooks everywhere want to be more hands on with the proteins they use. They are becoming dissatisfied with Cryovaced, pre-portioned precise shapes. They want to be cutting and portioning their own meats, utilizing the trim, creating rich broth from broken bone. It’s a beautiful thing. What saddens me, though, is that just as the cooks are becoming more eager to learn basic butchery, culinary schools are not teaching the art of butchery. A chef can come away from a thirty thousand dollar education and never learn how to bone the smallest animals – fish, rabbits, chickens. Some come into my kitchen having never killed a lobster.

Reported by www.tastingtable.com:
Another vegetable is also ripe for consumption at the same time of year: the hops plant. And beer isn’t the only beneficiary; forward-thinking hops farmers and brewers have pickled their crop of hops shoots by plunging them into a briny, fragrant solution. The resulting snack, long a delicacy in beer-crazy Belgium, is a cross between pickled asparagus and pickled beans.

Reported by www.nationalpost.com:
Among the words denied inclusion in the Oxford English Dictionary:
Locavor: A person who tries to eat only locally grown or produced food
Onionate: To overwhelm with post-dining breath
Peppier: A waiter whose sole job is to offer diners ground pepper, usually from a large pepper mill
Spatulate: Removing cake mixture from the side of a bowl with a spatula

Reported by AFP:
The locavore movement is boiling over following a commentary suggesting that the “math” underpinning the practice is flawed. Stephen Budiansky stirred up the pot with a piece in the New York Times arguing that locavores are mistaken on the notion that local food is better for energy conservation and the environment. “Words like ‘sustainability’ and ‘food-miles’ are thrown around without any clear understanding of the larger picture of energy and land use,” Budiansky wrote. He argues that on a commercial scale, large farms are far more energy-efficient than small ones and that transportation energy costs are often overstated by local food advocates, he said in the commentary titled “Math Lessons for Locavores.” Budiansky added that “eating food from a long way off is often the single best thing you can do for the environment, as counterintuitive as that sounds.”

Reported by John Lehndorff (www.JohnLehndorff.com):
Restaurateurs Jennifer Jasinski and Beth Gruitch recently opened Euclid Hall Bar & Kitchen, their third restaurant in and around Denver’s historic Larimer Square. Euclid’s menu includes Buffalo-Style Pig Ears, Braised Short Rib Poutine, and Pretzel Fried Pies. The second was Bistro Vendôme . To read my year-long feature on the opening of their first eatery, Rioja, click on:
www.JohnLehndorff.com):
http://www.riojadenver.com/raves/pdfs/PressureCooker1.pdf
Nibbles Food Trend Blog is now featured at: http://blogs.wherethelocalseat.com/Foodies/Denver-Food-and-Dining-Blogs.aspx

2011 American Salumi Calendar: www.americansalumi.com
Radio Nibbles: 8:25 a.m. Thursdays, KGNU – 885 FM, 1390 AM http://www.kgnu.org/
Eat In Eat Out: Business-to-business food trend forecast magazine: http://americanforecaster.com/
http://www.JohnLehndorff.com
Colorado’s top ice cream: http://www.usatoday.com/travel/destinations/2010-08-26-best-ice-cream_N.htm?csp=34
The Kombucha Report: http://www.teareport.com/

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